dog-soilders-2
Here are 10 more overlooked horror films! You can check out the first part of the list here.

fright night
Fright Night (1985)
Calling Fight Night overlooked might actually be a stretch. The film is pretty much recognized as a horror classic but subpar sequels and remakes have tarnished its name.

Charley Brewster (William Ragsdale) isn’t your average high schooler, thanks to the vampire (played by a very suave Chris Sarandon) that just moved in next door. Charley recruits local horror show host Peter Vincent (Roddy McDowall) for help, only to discover Mr. Vincent isn’t all he’s cracked up to be. Great effects and a spooky, fun ‘80s vibe make this required viewing for horror films.

dog-soilders-1
Dog Soldiers (2002)
I’m a sucker for werewolf flicks, and this one is criminally overlooked. Directed by Neil Marshall (The Descent), the film follows a group of British soldiers out for some war games in the Scottish Highlands who end up facing off against some nasty lycanthropes. It’s a fun, atmospheric flick that features some pretty good practical werewolf effects.

NIGHT-OF-THE-COMET
Night of the Comet (1984)
This is a great little zombie apocalypse flick overflowing with wondrous ‘80s cheese. The film starts just prior to the Earth’s exposure to a comet, which promptly destroys most life on the planet. Regina (Catherine Mary Stewart) and her sister Samantha (Kelli Maroney) both end up surviving the comet-borne apocalypse but now they have to put up with zombies! Oh yeah, the comet turned some people into zombies. Forgot to mention that. Star Trek: Voyager fans will recognize a young Robert “Chakotay” Beltran as Hector, another of the films’ few comet survivors.

Gate
The Gate (1987)
This is a great little creature feature from the ‘80s. Glen (a very young Stephen Dorff) accidentally opens a portal into hell with yep, you guessed it, rock & roll. The devil’s music. Glen, his nerdy friend Terry (Louis Tripp), and his sister have to vanquish the demons that come out of The Gate (which is really just a big hole in the ground)…before their parents get home! It might sound childish but it’s actually pretty creepy. Just wait for the scene where Terry accidentally falls down into The Gate…

lord-of-illusions
Lord of Illusions (1995)
This might be my favorite overlooked horror film. I’m biased because I’m a pretty big Scott Bakula fan (Quantum Leap ride or die). But the story is great too. Kind of a twisty, turny horror detective plot. Plus a super creepy vibe and decent (at the time, anyway) special effects.

Bakula plays private detective Harry D’Amour. An investigation in The City of Angels leads D’Amour down a path of magic and murder and takes him closer and closer to a cult and their dead (but for how long?) leader, Nix (played with menacing perfection by Daniel von Bargen). This film is unique in that it’s one of the few films directed by author Clive Barker, who wrote the original source material. Barker is, of course, the genius behind the original Hellraiser film and its source novel, The Hellbound Heart.

default-divider


default-divider

/wp-content/themes/ftstheme/images/Robert.jpg

About Robert

Raised by movies and television, Robert is struggling to adapt to real society. He learned at an early age that his father is not a ghost that he can capture in a homemade Ghostbusters trap and that real life archaeologists are nothing like Indiana Jones after shadowing one while in high school. Robert channels his love of film through French Toast Sunday and the movies, music, and escapism website known as totheescapehatch.com. Robert lives - LIVES - in Florida, the weirdest state of them all.

7 thoughts on “10 Overlooked Horror Films – Part 2

  1. I’ve seen The Gate and Night of the Comet. The Gate is kinda cool in a very-dated 80s kids movie with Harryhausen-ish effects, but I guess I’d give it a soft recommend, at least to people with Stephen Dorff fetishes. Comet was interesting; doubt I’ll ever watch it again, but it certainly had some interesting ideas (and execution).

    Been meaning to watch Fright Night forever (so yay, it’s overlooked by at least me), and have heard other good stuffs about Dog Soldiers.

    FYI – you have no live links to part one here. Also, I’ve not seen any of those.

  2. Pingback: 10 Overlooked Horror Films – Part 1 | French Toast Sunday

  3. People with Stephen Dorff fetishes…so, everyone? J/K (?). Yeah both The Gate and Night of the Comet are very cheesy ’80s. Fright Night is pretty cheesy as well but I’d put it a step above Gate and Comet. Great atmosphere, great story and cast. Dog Soldiers is pretty fun. If you like werewolf movies and/or Neil Marshall you should have a good time.

    Thanks for reading, Dylan!!!

  4. I’ve only seen Fright Night and The Gate from this list. Both during my childhood. Fright Night remains a favourite but I don’t remember much about The Gate other than I was scared while watching it all those years back. Totally forgot about the movie. Thanks for the remind, might as well re-watch it soon!

    • Funny enough I didn’t really see The Gate until after college (although I have vague memories of it from childhood). I could definitely see it scaring kids back in the day and sticking with them until now. That part where the kid falls in the hole is genuinely scary. Hope you enjoy the rewatch! Thanks for reading. :)

    • A lot of my favorite films from these lists are from the ’80s so I’m glad there’s so much love for Night of the Comet and others. It has that perfect creepy but totally fun vibe from the decade that doesn’t really exist anymore. And it’s definitely an underrated zombie movie. I would go so far as to say most zombie lovers don’t really know about it (?). Thanks for reading and commenting!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>